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May 28, 2010

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I love dating and this is why I always read free dating tips to apply them.....

But it was The Ragbag who pointed out that this rule has a duality: for the date to be socially acceptable, the rule must be adhered to by your date as well. In other words, there's a socially acceptable maximum too, given by inverting the equation:

I agree with you. You have given to us with such an large collection of information. Great work you have done by sharing them to all. simply superb.

Hey David, I am, to say the least intrigued with your info and would like permission to put your graph on my site and see what kind of response I get. I understand "stats" but I would like non-stat feedback from my Y audience.

DJ, feel free to reproduce the chart but please link back here as the source.

great tips. i remember these fondly when gas was a dollar a gallon. i think that we probably shouldn’t fall back on these, but i think everyone will adopt a few of them

Hi David

I hadn't thought much about this before!

A number of the online dating sites interview women in their 30's who are comfortable with being approached by men who are 15-20 years older than them.

I thought that this was a bit unusual but your chart seems to uphold their observations.

Well done!

I'm always sorprise how we can apply mathematics in love. We make all this experiments and theories, are we sure that it can work? We're too much different to know the best positive and perfect love match.

Actually, the original chart (with more detail) as well as the "upper limit" formula comes from here:

http://ianselvarajah.com/2007/03/malefemale-relationship-age-difference.html/

Cheers! :)

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