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October 15, 2010

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Until recently gay relationships were officially illegal in India- which led to whimsical harassment by police as well as the overwhelmingly conservative Indian society. Techie and geek circles are majority male, but surprisingly the above average intelligence of the techies has not made them any more tolerant. As for teens committing suicide, it reminds me of Oscar Wilde's and Lord Byron's creativity being hounded, though Alexander the Great had better luck as gay guy. The OK Cupid study is both fascinating in it's use of data and not anecdotes , as well the bold stand to take up a social issue for a business. To tolerate evil is to participate in it- just like Anti Semitism and Racism on color (or nationality)- hatred has no place in civilized society. If you want to hate gays, or jews,or asians- go to Iran

Mr. Smith,

I am very sympathetic with your political cause. However, I believe you are engaging in what you are accusing others of doing - stereotyping. All stereotypes have some basis in truth, which is why they are stereotypes, but we shouldn't promote those that make our interests look good, and hide those that make us look bad. A stereotype is a stereotype.

"the data say what the data say" - is it good statistics to take a single corporate funded "study" that you admittedly say is not peer-reviewed academic analysis, and is self-reported, and turn around and say that this is "truth"? Because you agree with it? Is that confirmation bias?

I don't mean any disrespect. I think your post is morally right, but I don't think it's good statistics.

Gary, thanks for your comments, but I'm not sure I understand your point about stereotyping.

I'm going to stand by what I said. The data *do* say what the data say, here and always. Amongst those who have profiles at Ok Cupid, the conclusions as stated in the OkCupid post are valid. Now, you could take issue that the data analysis was done incorrectly, or (more likely), that the sample isn't representative of the population as a whole.

In the end though, this is all just data summarization, not statistical inference. Nonetheless, I find it to be useful and interesting data.

Thanks for contributing to the discussion, and no disrespect intended here either.

Fascinating and intriguing. Thanks for the heads up on the info and findings.

What is especially interesting to me is that the personality traits graph shown here nails me to a tee. And while this, I suppose, in some ways is stereotyping me as a gay man, it is not being trotted out to nail me to some negative demographic, it is merely "reporting" results. Could someone use this in a negative way to scar? Yup, but the odd thing is that (from my gay prism-of-vision) it is the straight guy who might be in the cross hairs of negative implications.

Either way, good stuff!

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