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January 28, 2011

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It's been quite a while now since Tufte published his books on data visualization and misleading diagrams.

Are the President, Vice-President, and advisers, such nincompoops that they do not even read the visual they are presenting to the American people (and the world). Or, are they deliberately trying to mislead?

My guess is that politicians, like many of the people they represent, are walking around half asleep, mouthing platitudes, and not taking the time to think.

This might be a rookie mistake but has anyone considered that it was done deliberately to exaggerate the importance of the USA's GDP?

"Look how much bigger our balls are than China's"

Also, the 3D rendering on the circles (spheres?) results in fuzzy edges on the circles. To me, it's hard to see that China's circle is larger than Japan's. Only after magnifying the image 400% did I convince myself that China's was, indeed, larger.
It is so much clearer to compare the economies by using a horizontal bar chart :
barplot(c(2.5,3.3,5.3,5.7,14.6), horiz=T, names.arg=c("France","Germany","Japan","China","US"))

I think the post is very good ,you look at it ,and you?

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