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November 08, 2011

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David,

Thanks for the link. I eagerly worked through the time series book as i was having some difficulties in putting time series models in practice. I cannot thank Dr. Coghlan enough. This is the simplest and quickest time series book that i have come across. I finished the whole thing in one sitting and now looking forward to working through other books in the series.

Once again, thank you for posting the links and thank Dr. Coghlan for writing such wonderful books and making them available under creative commons license.

I looked at the multivariate book but was a little disturbed at the lack of basic R knowledge. There are a few functions written there many lines long that can be knocked off in just a few lines of R... and no, not Hadley package R, just base R.

thanks for the links. isn't it a little unfair to just criticise? perhaps providing the concise code to the author would be more helpful?

I've sent the author all of the functions (but 1 I think) completely rewritten. And, I do appreciate the book. I think that it's very helpful to take students from an introduction to the subject to doing it in R.

But even if I hadn't done that I think it's perfectly fine to criticize. I have more of a responsibility to future students of R than to the feelings of the author of the book.

It's not even just that it's not R-like... there are loads of warning that come up in recent versions of R for deprecated functions. The original functions are fragile, confusingly named variables... I could go on... just as many a critic could without ever sending the code. We should not be teaching students to use R like that.

(all this and now I realize I didn't even read the intro section on how to use R and such. That probably needs lots of work too)

Hi JJC,

Could you make that rewritten code available for others who -like myself- would like to learn to use R correctly? Thx!

Jack

Thanks for the link. But as beautiful as R is, It's not easy copying the result of your work to microsoft word or microsoft Excel keeping the format of table intact. Any solution? Thanks

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