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May 22, 2012

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Looks like 2 sad eye, maybe a nation crying.

Unfortunately, the "cleaning up" using Illustrator removed at least the congress member with the highest grade level, presumably Rep. Daniel Lungren (R), CA (as can be seen in another graphic in the linked pdf), leaving the impression that the Democrats have the congress member with the highest rank. Not so nice aspect of an otherwise nice communication of stats to the public.


Not that it makes that much difference I'm guessing, but why are all the Democrats voting scores < 0 and Republican voting scores > 0? I would think there would be some overlap since anecdotal information has some Democrats voting pro-conservative on some issues and vice versa for Republicans.

@Danny, that's for the most recent Congress, which is the most partisan in history. The latest Congressional voting ratings from National Journal show that there's no overlap between Republicans and Democrats any more. "There's not a single Democratic Senator who was more conservative than the most liberal Republican." So it's likely the chart is accurate.

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